RIBBECK (2024 BX1) Aubrite meteorite fall (> 983 g) between Selbelang (Paulinenaue), Ribbeck (Nauen) and Berge (Nauen), Havelland, Brandenburg, Germany at 00:32:38 UT on 21 January 2024

Last update: 1 March 2024 (15:08 CET)

On 5 February 2024 it was officially anounced in a press release by the Museum für Naturkunde Berlin that the fall was classified as an Aubrite: press release. The classification results were sent to the NomCom of the Meteoritical Society on 2 February and on 16 February 2024 the witnessed fall was officially registered as RIBBECK in the Meteoritical Bulletin Database of the Meteoritical Society.


The find of three fragments (91g (Filip Samuel Nikodem), 57g (Kryspin Kmieciak), 23g (Michał Nebelski)) of one mass (171g (wet) in total), probably on a field a few hundred meters west of Ribbeck castle and already in the Paulineaue community, was reported on 25 January 2024 by a commercial Polish search team consisting of Filip Samuel Nikodem, Michał Nebelski, Kryspin Kmieciak and Andrzej Owczarzak from Poznań in Poland. This find was crucial to help other search teams to know what kind of meteorite they had to look for.

On 26 January (9:30 a.m.) Gucsik Bence and Balla Zoltan from Hungary found a 111.193-gram specimen (dried) after only 58 minutes of searching. On the same day around 1 p.m. first Dominik Dieter (24) and then Cara Weher (18), two geology students at the Freie Universität Berlin, found two small specimens (4.5 gr. and 3.1 gr.) near Berge (Nauen). The two students were members of the meteorite search team of the Museum für Naturkunde Berlin (MfN) and its cooperation partners, including the Freie Universität Berlin and the German Aerospace Center (DLR). The specimens will be added to the meteorite collection of the Museum für Naturkunde Berlin. German meteorite enthusiast David Göttlich found a specimen of 37.5 grams (dried, 39.x g when found wet) as well. On 27 January Andreas Möller, Jürgen and Manuela Rendtel, Ina Rendtel, Peter Lindner and Felix Bettonvil of the search team of Arbeitskreis Meteore e.V. (AKM) found about 10 masses and fragments at three locations near Ribbeck, five after only about 10 minutes of searching and within the first two hours of search. At one location several fragments of a 47.01-gram mass, which most likely fragmented on impact, were found. Ina Rendtel found the first 14.76-gram fragment, then Peter Lindner found a 20.67-gram fragment nearby, which is currently being analysed by Detlev Degering for short-lived radio isotopes with Gamma spectrometry at VKTA’s Niederniveaumesslabor Felsenkeller in Dresden. The third found fragment, weighing 4.3 grams, was found by Ina Rendtel and is currently being analysed by Prof. Addi Bischoff at Münster University. Another small 1.36-gram fragment was found by Felix Bettonvil and is currently held at Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands. After Jürgen Rendtel found a 3.56-gram specimen several other very small fragments of the 47.01-gramcould be retrieved. On the same day and at a second location the AKM team member Jürgen Rendtel found a 20.51-gram mass. Finally, team member Andreas Möller found a fragmented 15.59-gram specimen. The search team of the Museum für Naturkunde Berlin (MfN) and its cooperation partners (including Nimisha Verma, Julia Maia and Dr. Laëtitia Allibert) found 10 specimens on the same day as well. A 22.04-gram mass was found by Julien Liehmann. On 27 January Tobias Hofmann found a 14.20-gram (dry) specimen at location 52°37’05.3″N, 12°45’33.3″E near Ribbeck. On 27 January Dennis Harries found a mass of 10.2 grams at location 52.61542° N, 12.77355° E. On 28 January AKM team members Petra Strunk found a 4.77-gram specimen and Antal Igaz found a 26.2-gram mass. On the same day the MfN/DLR team found 9 specimens. The team around Filip Samuel Nikodem, Michał Nebelski, Kryspin Kmieciak and Kazimierz Magneto reportedly found four additional specimens weighing 60, 30, 20 and 5 grams. On 28 January Mateusz Żmija, Jarosław Morys, Michał Zimny, and Marzena Rogozińska found two specimens, weighing 9.251 (52°37’15.1″N, 12°45’40.1″E) and 3.384 grams (52°36’41.8″N, 12°46’39.8″E), near Ribbeck and between Ribbeck and Berge. At 9:34 a.m. on 28 January Agata Roicka found a 21.16-gram specimen and in the afternoon Zsofia Biro (of the Bence search group) found a 5-gram specimen. On 29 January Sven Lauber found a ~3.8-gramm specimen. Late on the same day (29-30 Jan.) Kryspin Kmieciak announced the find of a 225-gram mass. On 30 January Michael Hurtig found a 14.13-gramm mass (3.1×2.5 cm). On the same day Emődi Csaba, Nagy Olivér, Kereszty Zsolt of the Hungarian Meteoritical Society reported the finding of two masses (10.62 grams (dried, 11.04 when found wet at 9:50 a.m.) (52°36’34.308” N, 12°47’21.681” E) and ~21 grams (wet in situ) (52°36’30.380” N, 12°47’21.257” E) south of Berge. Then on 3 February the Hungarian team found its third meteorite. On 30 January (10.05 a.m.) Mirko Graul found a thumb-seized 14.84-gram mass. On 2 February Paweł Zaręba found two specimens in four fragments and some crumbs weighing 17.2 grams. The first specimen found around 10:43 a.m. weighs 9.2 grams and was found at location 52°36’28.1″N, 12°47’46.0″E. The second one weighs 8 grams and was found around 13:36 p.m. at location 52°36’23.0″N, 12°48’23.4″E. On 3 February Thomas Becker found a 12-gram specimen (28 x 23 x 17 mm) and in the afternoon Daniel Steiniger found a 5.45-gram specimen at location 52°36’19.3″N, 12°48’28.2″E . On the same day at around 10:08 a.m. Paweł Zaręba found a third mass (5.7 g, two fragments) at location 52°36’24.8″N, 12°48’16.9″E. Some commercial search teams have found other smaller masses. On 3 February Andreas Möller (AKM) found an oriented 2.86-gram specimen and in the afternoon Sang-Hyeok Lee found a 11.7-gram mass (dried, wet in-situ weight was 12.4g) at location 52°36’42.0″N, 12°47’04.0″E. On the same day Tom Hughes found a 4.14-gram (dry) mass (4.4g when in situ) at location 52°36.628′ N, 12°48.513′ E. On 3 February Maksymilian Jakubczak found a 4.93-gram fragment which seems to match a 5.30-gram fragment found by Szymon Kozłowski about 750 meters away on the same day. At 11:22 a.m. on 3 February Mieszko Kołodziej found a 22.039-gram specimen. On 4 February AKM team member André Knöfel found a 3.73-gram specimen. All together the AKM team members have found about 120 grams of meteorites. On 4 February Julien Liehmann found an oriented 7-gram mass and Michael Hurtig found a 2.80-gram (2.80g and 0.02g) specimen and a 12.40-gram mass. On 11 February he found another four partly fragmented specimens weighing between 1.5 and 4.5 grams. Commercial search teams from Poland found several specimens (~3g, ~5g, ~5g, and ~5g on 2 February, 3.3g on 3 February). On 4 February Leon Thann found a 5.193-gram specimen and in the early afternoon Olek Błasiak found an 8.11-gram mass, reportedly at location 52°36’54.0″N, 12°47’33.0″E. On 10 February Ralf Simmat and Charlotte Bedke found a 24.37-gram mass (25.74 gram in situ) near Ribbeck and Leon Thann reportedly found a 4.640-gram mass. On the same day Mirko Graul found a 1.96-gram specimen and on 15 February he found a 2.69-gram (dry) specimen. On 11-12 February Enrico Hoff and his son found four specimens. Someone calling himself ‘Ri Di’ claims having found a 47.5-gram specimen on 11 February. Zsolt Kereszty reports having found a 3.6-gram specimen on a field south of Lietzow on 14 February. On 14 February Tomasz Aurora reports the find of a 3.19-gram specimen near the wind park south of Berge. At 15:30 CET on 15 February 2024 Thomas Naumann found 7.79-gram specimen (wet, ~2 x ~2 cm) at location 52°36’29.2″N, 12°48’17.1″E. On the same day Marcin Rościszewski reportedly found a 6.716-gram mass and Jarosław Morys reportedly found a 1.894-gram and an oriented 3.384-gram specimen with flowlines. On 16 February Jarosław Morys’s team reportedly found a 9.263-gram mass and on 17 February a 2.532-gram specimen. At 3 p.m. on 21 February Abdelkabir Oulgour reportedly found a 2.5-gram specimen. On 25 February Marzena Rogozińska reportedly found a 2.86-gram specimen near location 52°36’27.1″N, 12°48’10.6″E. On 27 February Mirko Graul found his fourth meteorite, weighing 1.07 grams. Many private German, Polish and Hungarian meteorite enthusiasts found their very first meteorite during this winter’s Ribbeck search activity. Several finders, especially the ones of larger masses, report that the found specimens emit a sulphurous smell, possibly because of the terrestrial weathering of Oldhamite within the meteorites. The official classification of the meteorite started on 29 January and the classification results were sent to the NomCom of the Meteoritical Society on 2 February 2024.

Known Ribbeck strewn field (Version 6, updated 22 February 2024, 23:08 CET)

Currently known strewn field, based on kindly provided data from different finders. We thank all the finders very much for sharing their information! The colour strips show the calculated potential fall locations of different masses and their assumed weight (effective 8 February 2024), including some uncertainties, which were created during the observed fragmentation of the meteoroid (between 5.50 and 6.30 seconds after 00:32:38 UT), as recorded with Sirko Molau’s camera AMS16 in Ketzür (Beetzseeheide) and by Michael Aye from Lichtenrade, Tempelhof-Schöneberg, Berlin. There were apparently larger uncertainties concerning the calculated fall locations of masses because of measurement issues with Michael Aye’s handheld smartphone video. The uncertainties are actually substantially larger than indicated in the coloured stripes in the image above (effective 8 February 2024). These calculations of possible fall locations of masses were provided and published as first update on 8 February 2024 (22.00 CET) and second update (an updated calculated fall zone for the presumed and yet unfound mass M (~400 g, broad red strip) and F (80–90 g, broad violet strip ) on 14 February (17:30 CET) by the excellent team of Pavel Spurný, Jiří Borovička and Lukáš Shrbený of the Department of Interplanetary Matter at the Czech Institute of Astronomy of the CAS and can be found here: Zánik malé planetky 2024 BX1 západně od Berlína 21. ledna 2024 zachycený kamerami Evropské bolidové sítě Image: karmaka

We kindly invite any finders of Ribbeck meteorites to send us ( ribbeckmeteorite(et)planet.ms ) their information about fall locations and weights of found masses, which will then be added to the map above and forwarded to the Museum of Natural History, Berlin so that the finds and locations can be officially documented and added to future scientific publications about this extraordinary meteorite fall. Thank you!

The bolide’s trajectory projected to the ground (as provided by Pavel Spurný, Jiří Borovička a Lukáš Shrbený, see above, in cooperation with AllSky7Germany: (Sirko Molau, André Knöfel and Mike Hankey (AMS)) and the fall locations of some meteorite masses (as of 8 February), kindly provided by several finders of meteorites. Image: karmaka

First reported find (171 grams)

Two broken fragments (91g and 57g) combined. Photo published by Zsolt Kereszty on 25 January 2024

Three fragments (91g, 57g and 23g) of a 171-gram mass combined, with translucent fusion crust and flow lines. Photo published by Zsolt Kereszty on 25 January 2024

The broken face of the 91-gram fragment of the 171-gram mass. Photo: Filip Samuel Nikodem

Two fragments (91g, 57g). Photo published by Filip Samuel Nikodem on 25 January 2024

One of the first found fragments (91g). Photo published by Zsolt Kereszty on 25 January 2024

One of the first found fragments. Photo published by Zsolt Kereszty on 25 January 2024

Second reported find (111.1927 grams (dried), intact specimen)

111.193-gram mass in situ. Photo: Gucsik Bence

Almost fully fusion-crusted 111.193-gram mass in situ. Photo: Gucsik Bence

Beautiful glossy fusion crust with contraction cracks of the 111.193-gram mass in situ. Photo: Gucsik Bence

111.193-gram mass in situ in foliage on 26 January 2024. Photo: Gucsik Bence

Photo: Gucsik Bence

Third reported find (37.79 grams, intact specimen)

Specimen in situ (37.79 grams, about 4.7 cm in length) Photo: David Göttlich

Photo: David Göttlich

Photo: David Göttlich

Fourth and fifth reported finds (4.5 and 3.1 grams)

The 4.5-gram specimen of the MFN Berlin finds in situ. Photo: MFN Berlin/ Cevin Dettlaf

The 4.5-gram specimen of the MFN Berlin finds. Photo: Andreas Kraatz

The 3.1- and the 4.5-gram meteorites found by the MFN Berlin search team on 26 January 2024. Image: RBB

Regional news report presenting the some of the found specimens and fragments. (RBB24, Brandenburg Aktuell, 26 January 2024)

Regional news report presenting the some of the found specimens and fragments. (RBB24, Abendschau, 26 January 2024)

AKM (Arbeitskreis Meteore e.V.) finds (> 90 grams)

AKM search team members joined by Prof A. Bischoff are presenting their finds on 27 January 2024. Photo: Andreas Möller (Arbeitskreis Meteore e.V.)

One of the AKM finds in situ on 27 January. Photo: Andreas Möller (Arbeitskreis Meteore e.V.)

One of the AKM finds in situ. A find by Jürgen and Manuela Rendtel on 27 January. Photo: Andreas Möller (Arbeitskreis Meteore e.V.)

Close-up of Jürgen and Manuela Rendtel’s AKM find on 27 January 2024. Photo: Andreas Möller (Arbeitskreis Meteore e.V.)

Fragmented mass in situ, found on 27 January by Andreas Möller. Photo: Andreas Möller (Arbeitskreis Meteore e.V.)

Fragments of a shattered meteorite. Photo: Andreas Möller (Arbeitskreis Meteore e.V.)

Meeting of AKM search team members with D. Göttlich in the field. Video: Märkische Allgemeine/AKM

Additional masses

255-gram mass

A completely fusion-crusted 225-gram mass, published by Kryspin Kmieciak on 29 January 2024

A completely fusion-crusted 225-gram mass, published by Kryspin Kmieciak on 29 January 2024

Bubbly fusion crust and contraction cracks on the 225-gram mass. Photo published by Kryspin Kmieciak on 30 January 2024

A 10.62-gram specimen ({\displaystyle d} 25.6 mm), found by the search team of the Hungarian Meteoritical Society on 30 January 2024. Photo: Zsolt Kereszty

A 20/21-gram specimen, found by the search team of the Hungarian Meteoritical Society on 30 January 2024. Photo: Zsolt Kereszty

On 27 January Dennis Harries found a mass of 10.2 grams at location 52.61542° N, 12.77355° E. Photo: Dennis Harries

A 22.04-gram specimen found on 27 January 2024 by Julien Liehmann. Photo: Julien Liehmann

A thumb-seized 14.84-gram specimen found by Mirko Graul on 30 January 2024. Photo: Mirko Graul

One of the DLR-MfN-FU finds on 27 January in situ. Photo: Julia Maia

A 4.2-gram meteorite which was found by Dr. Laëtitia Allibert of the DLR-MfN-FU team on 27 January 2024.

A small specimen (3.4 g, 9mm) in situ, found by Dr. Szilárd Csizmadia as member of the DLR-MfN team at 10:15 a.m. on 28 January 2024. Photo: Szilard Csizmadia

A small specimen found by Nimisha Verma, member of the DLR-MfN-FU search team, on 27 January 2024

A 14.2-gram specimen (diameter of ~3cm) found near Ribbeck. Photos: Tobias Hofmann

The 9.251-gram specimen found by Mateusz Żmija , Jarosław Morys, Michał Zimny, and Marzena Rogozińska on 28 January 2024. Photo: Jarosław Morys / Michał Zimny

A specimen (~60 grams) found by Filip Nikodem and his team, most likely in the afternoon of 28 January. Photo: Filip Nikodem

Specimen of 53.9 grams found by Filip Samuel Nikodem on 27 January 2024. Photo: Filip Samuel Nikodem

Paweł Zaręba’s first (on the left, 9.2 grams, partly fragmented into three pieces on impact) and second find (8 g) on 2 February 2024. Total weight of all the fragments of the two masses: 17.2 g. Photos: Paweł Zaręba

Paweł Zaręba’s finds 9.2 grams (left), 8 grams (centre) and 5.7 grams (left). Photos: Paweł Zaręba

The third find of the Hungarian search team in the morning of 3 February 2024. Photo published by Zsolt Kereszty on 3 February 2024

A 4.4-gram mass, found by Tom Hughes on 3 February 2024. Photo: Tom Hughes

A 2.86-gram mass, found by Andreas Möller on 3 February 2024. Photo: Andreas Möller

An oriented 7-gram mass, found by Julien Liehmann on 4 February 2024. Photo: Julien Liehmann

André Knöfel’s 3.86-gram specimen in situ on 4 February 2024. Photo: André Knöfel

The three masses found by Michael Hurtig (14.13g on 30 January, 12.40g and 2.94g (2.80 and 0.02g) on 4 February 2024). Photo: Michael Hurtig.

Michael Hurtig’s 12.94-gram mass in situ on 4 February 2024. Photo: Michael Hurtig

Matching fragments of Maksymilian Jakubczak (4.93g, above) and Szymon Kozłowski (5.30g, below), both found on 3 February, about 750 meters apart from each other. Photos published by Marcin Ha on 4 February.

Agata Roicka’s 21.16-gram find on 28 January 2024. Photo: Mieszko Kołodziej

Zsofia Biro’s 5-gram find on 28 January 2024. Photo: Gucsik Bence

Mirko Graul’s 1.96-gram find in situ on 10 February 2024. Photo: Mirko Graul

Thomas Becker’s 12-gram find (28 x 23 x 17 mm) in situ on 3 February 2024. Photo: Thomas Becker

One of the four meteorites found by Enrico Hoff and son on 11 or 12 February in situ. Photo: Enrico Hoff

Four partly fragmented specimens weighing between 1.5 and 4.5 grams in situ on 11 February 2024. Photos: Michael Hurtig

Four specimens found in February 2024 by David Göttlich. Photos: David Göttlich

A 5.45-gram specimen in situ in the afternoon of 3 February 2024, found by Daniel Steiniger. Photo: Daniel Steiniger

Sang-Hyeok Lee’s 11.7-gram mass in-situ on 3 February. Photo: A. Folta

A 2.69-gram specimen in situ on 15 February 2024, found by Mirko Graul. Photo: Mirko Graul

A 24.37-gram mass (25.74 gram wet) in situ near Ribbeck on 10 February 2024, found by Ralf Simmat and Charlotte Bedke. Photo: Ralf Simmat and Charlotte Bedke

Tomasz Aurora’s 3.19-gram find in-situ near the wind park south of Berge. Photo: Tomasz Aurora

A 7.79-gram specimen (~2 x ~2 cm) in situ on 15 February 2024, found by Thomas Naumann. Photo: Thomas Naumann

Jarosław Morys’s oriented 3.384-gram find in-situ on 15 February 2024. Photo: Jarosław Morys

Mirco Graul’s 1.07-gram find in-situ on 27 February 2024. Photo: Mirko Graul

Media

A video about the analysis and classification of the Ribbeck meteorite fall as Aubrite. Video: Museum für Naturkunde Berlin (5 February 2024)

3D model of a Ribbeck fragment, provided by Delft Meteorite Lab

Asteroid 2024 BX1

Asteroid 2024 BX1 was first discovered at 21:48 UT on 20 January 2024 by Krisztián Sárneczky at the GINOP-KHK Piszkéstető Mountain Station of Konkoly Observatory in Hungary. Shortly after midnight on 21 January it was calculated and announced that the meteoroid would hit earth near location N 52.6, E 12.5.

The discovery images of 2024BX1 by Krisztián Sárneczky, made with the 60-cm Schmidt Telescope at Piszkéstető Mountain Station, part of Konkoly Observatory, Hungary.

Video: A. Sonka

Last image of asteroid 2024 BX1 from Schiaparelli Observatory near Varese, Italy (MPC 204) by Luca Buzzi and Gianni Galli.

The bolide

The bolide recorded from Lichtenrade, Tempelhof-Schöneberg, Berlin. Video: Michael Aye (@allplanets)

The bolide, recorded with the AllSky7 camera AMS16 in Ketzür (Beetzseeheide). Video: Sirko Molau

The bolide, recorded with the FRIPON camera in Ketzür (Beetzseeheide) (52,495° / 12,631°). Video: Sirko Molau

The bolide recorded from the Europahaus at Augustusplatz in Leipzig. Video: Leipziger Stadtwerke

Video: GionGionni

Video: C.T. in Berlin area

Video: Leszek (@makdaam@chaos.social)

Video: FloBerlin

Video: Christian Heller from Herzfelde